On This Day in History: July 01, 

2019 – May God Bless and Save the United States of America – Our Constitutional Republic !

#4B – Where Is the Spirit of 1776?

It is the year of our Lord Twenty Twenty and of the United States of America the Two Hundred Forty-four. We the People have seemingly lost our way. Where is the fervor and zeal of our Founding Fathers and those of our ancestors who established our Constitutional Republic as a bastion of Liberty? We the People need to reflect upon the Words of James Madison, Founding Father, Father of the Constitution and Fourth President of the United States of America.

The government of the United States is a definite government, confined to specified objects. It is not like the state governments, whose powers are more general. Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government. (Speech in the House of Representatives, January 10, 1794)

The right of freely examining public characters and measures, and of free communication among the people thereon … has ever been justly deemed the only effectual guardian of every other right. (Virginia Resolutions, December 21, 1798)

To the press alone, checkered as it is with abuses, the world is indebted for all the triumphs which have been gained by reason and humanity over error and oppression. (Report on the Virginia Resolutions, 1798)

To render the justice of the war on our part the more conspicuous, the reluctance to commence it was followed by the earliest and strongest manifestations of a disposition to arrest its progress. The sword was scarcely out of the scabbard before the enemy was apprised of the reasonable terms on which it would be resheathed. (Second Inaugural Address, March, 1813)

To exclude foreign intrigues and foreign partialities, so degrading to all countries and so baneful to free ones; to foster a spirit of independence too just to invade the rights of others, too proud to surrender our own, too liberal to indulge unworthy prejudices ourselves and too elevated not to look down upon them in others; to hold the union of the States on the basis of their peace and happiness; to support the Constitution, which is the cement of the Union, as well in its limitations as in its authorities; to respect the rights and authorities reserved to the States and to the people as equally incorporated with and essential to the success of the general… as far as sentiments and intentions such as these can aid the fulfillment of my duty, they will be a resource which can not fail me. (Second Inaugural Address, March, 1813)

It is a principle incorporated into the settled policy of America, that as peace is better than war, war is better than tribute. (Letter to the Dey of Algiers, August, 1816)

Among the features peculiar to the political system of the United States, is the perfect equality of rights which it secures to every religious sect. (Letter to Jacob de la Motta, August 1820)

Equal laws protecting equal rights — the best guarantee of loyalty and love of country. (Letter to Jacob de la Motta, August 1820)

We are teaching the world the great truth that Governments do better without Kings & Nobles than with them. The merit will be doubled by the other lesson that Religion Flourishes in greater purity, without than with the aid of Government. (Letter to Edward Livingston, July 10, 1822)

What spectacle can be more edifying or more seasonable, than that of Liberty and Learning, each leaning on the other for their mutual & surest support? (Letter to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822)

A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or, perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives. (Letter to W.T. Barry, August 4, 1822)

I entirely concur in the propriety of resorting to the sense in which the Constitution was accepted and ratified by the nation. In that sense alone it is the legitimate Constitution. And if that is not the guide in expounding it, there may be no security. (Letter to Henry Lee, June 25, 1824)

The eyes of the world being thus on our Country, it is put the more on its good behavior, and under the greater obligation also, to do justice to the Tree of Liberty by an exhibition of the fine fruits we gather from it. (Letter to James Monroe, December 16, 1824)

On the distinctive principles of the Government … of the U. States, the best guides are to be found in… The Declaration of Independence, as the fundamental Act of Union of these States. (Letter to Thomas Jefferson, February 8, 1825)

The best service that can be rendered to a Country, next to that of giving it liberty, is in diffusing the mental improvement equally essential to the preservation, and the enjoyment of the blessing. (Letter to Littleton Dennis Teackle, March 29, 1826)

He will live in the memory and gratitude of the wise & good, as a luminary of Science, as a votary of liberty, as a model of patriotism, and as a benefactor of human kind. (On Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Nicholas P. Trist, July 6, 1826)

He was certainly one of the most learned men of the age. It may be said of him as has been said of others that he was a “walking Library,” and what can be said of but few such prodigies, that the Genius of Philosophy ever walked hand in hand with him. (On Thomas Jefferson in a letter to Samuel Harrison Smith, November 4, 1826)

It is due to justice; due to humanity; due to truth; to the sympathies of our nature; in fine, to our character as a people, both abroad and at home, that they should be considered, as much as possible, in the light of human beings, and not as mere property. As such, they are acted upon by our laws, and have an interest in our laws. (Speech to the Virginia Ratifying Convention, December 2, 1829)

It is sufficiently obvious, that persons and property are the two great subjects on which Governments are to act; and that the rights of persons, and the rights of property, are the objects, for the protection of which Government was instituted. These rights cannot well be separated. (Speech at the Virginia Convention, December 2, 1829)

The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse. (Speech in the Virginia constitutional convention, Dec 2, 1829)

It has been said that all Government is an evil. It would be more proper to say that the necessity of any Government is a misfortune. This necessity however exists; and the problem to be solved is, not what form of Government is perfect, but which of the forms is least imperfect. (To an unidentified correspondent, 1833)

You give me a credit to which I have no claim in calling me “the writer of the Constitution of the United States.” This was not, like the fabled Goddess of Wisdom, the offspring of a single brain. It ought to be regarded as the work of many heads and many hands. (Letter to William Cogswell, March 10, 1834)

Whatever may be the judgment pronounced on the competency of the architects of the Constitution, or whatever may be the destiny of the edifice prepared by them, I feel it a duty to express my profound and solemn conviction … that there never was an assembly of men, charged with a great and arduous trust, who were more pure in their motives, or more exclusively or anxiously devoted to the object committed to them. (circa 1835)

It becomes all therefore who are friends of a Government based on free principles to reflect, that by denying the possibility of a system partly federal and partly consolidated, and who would convert ours into one either wholly federal or wholly consolidated, in neither of which forms have individual rights, public order, and external safety, been all duly maintained, they aim a deadly blow at the last hope of true liberty on the face of the Earth. (Notes on Nullification)

May God Bless and Save the United States of America —
Our Constitutional Republic !