On This Day in History: December 01, 

1660 – First Navigation Act passed by the British Parliament to regulate colonial commerce to suit English needs. 1955 – Rosa Parks refuses to give up her seat to a white man on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama.

Respect for the Sacred Things of Others

A portion of this article is reprinted from an article first published 15 September 2010. In the Gospel of the Redman, the Seatons record the Twelve Commandments of the Redman. The first is stated as follows: There is but one Great Spirit. He is eternal,

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MIDTERM ELECTIONS

It is less than 90 days until the Midterm Elections on 8 November. The first defense to our constitution and the Constitutional Republic it established is the Ballot Box. If you are a citizen of the United States and over 18 years old and do

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THE CONSCIENCE OF A PATRIOT

Americans must always be concerned with the direction that our America is taking. We the People, as a nation, are always going toward FREEDOM or away from it toward SLAVERY. For on the continuum of FREEDOM and SLAVERY — you cannot stand still. Each of

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Today Is Constitution Day

At the end of the Constitutional Convention in September 1787, a Mrs. Elizabeth Powell of Philadelphia asked Benjamin Franklin, “Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?” With no hesitation whatsoever, Franklin responded, “A republic, madam, if you can keep it.” I

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The NFL 2020 Season Opener and 9/11

So opening night of the NFL season is passed. Compared to last year their viewership was down by six million – a ten year low. This 9/11 opener honored everything but what it should in the public square. Notably missing was any mention of the

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Law and Order v Anarchy

Our Founding Fathers gave us a Constitutional Republic. A nation based upon law for We the People, the rulers, and our elected representatives, the servants. The supreme law of the land is our 1787 Constitution, as amended. We the People gained our Bill of Rights

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The Ten Cannots and the Federal Government

It was in 1916, just three years after the ratification of the Sixteenth Amendment on the direct Income Tax, that a Presbyterian Minister, William J. H. Boetcker, published his oft quoted Ten Cannots, which are usually erroneously attributed to Abraham Lincoln. These maxims should have

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